My Hairdressing Diary

On December 6, 2017, Posted by , In General,Hair Extensions, By ,,, , With No Comments

Every now and then, a person should toot his own horn, it’s good for the ego. I spend alot of time analyzing and forecasting trends, and its quite a thrill to see your forecast come true. I wonder if weather forecasters get the same satisfaction….In 2015, I had written in one of my columns that choppy, wispy, and uneven bangs were on the way out. I even went so far as to prophetize that by this year, the trend would lean towards a long solid bang. Many readers wrote back scoffing the heavy-bang prediction, saying that it would never come true. I was happy to see the return of the blunt bang on the cover of the American Salon magazine. Several articles in other May issues of fashion magazines raved about the appearance of the blunt bangs that had graced the Spring runway shows. While other stylists are satisfied following trends, I find my satisfaction in creating them.

 This installment of Hairdressing Diary focuses on a photoshoot I conducted in 2015. I was preparing for that year’s NAHA (North American hairstyling Awards), and I had a few ideas I had been throwing around in my head that I wanted to try out. I decided to enter the Avant-Garde category, which consists of hairstyles that border on the eccentric and sometimes bizarre.

I had worked out my ideas on paper a few months prior to the shoot. I made a list of the supplies I would need, and then tried to construct a budget. My original idea involved elaborate underwater lighting and costumes that revolved around a mermaid theme. It soon became clear that there would be no way to finance such an undertaking. I was a “starving artist”, so to speak, so I had to come up with a new idea that would not put me in a financial mudhole. I found my inspiration in an old cemetery, of all places, in the form of a large statue of an angel. I knew I had to recreate that sculpture, but at the time I had no clue as to how I would go about it. Later that evening, I began constructing the wings that would later be used in the shoot. They had to look like stone, but at the same time be light enough for the model to wear for several hours of shooting. I stayed up the entire night making the wings out of papier-mache, which I painted gray using acrylic paint. I found that the paint looked authentic on the wings, so I tested it on my skin, and it looked very convincing. The only question was, could I use this paint to cover an entire body? I dismissed the idea of using theatrical make-up, because it always appeared moist on the skin. I needed something that looked like a statue, and acrylic paint was just what I was looking for. I bought six tubes of paint, estimating that it would take at least that much to cover a person.